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Marks , Bettina

For more information about this artist, please email us at info@kiptonart.com or call 212-486-2608.


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Who\\\'s Smiling Now Daddy?
Oil on Canvas




Bettina is a storyteller. Whether she is performing, directing, writing, designing or being in the moment... she is telling a story. “When I work, I usually start with a concept or theme. My ideas come from everywhere. The theme or mood, can come from a picture, a place, a historical period or event, words, a movie or simply a feeling. From there, I research and assemble my visual pictures to create the story or series. I like to mix a conceptual idea with a visual idea. That is, to interpret a concept visually, but not literally. To abstract upon the idea and suggest motifs that will symbolize a theme, or create a feeling of the theme, but not necessarily to illustrate it. This is the most challenging, to create a mood or character from an idea. Adding all the elements together brings the idea into sharper focus and the concept, a reality.” While working in the Asian Art Department of the Brooklyn Museum she began painting on silk. The works of Chinese masters, Japanese woodblock prints and Thai and Cambodian buddhas were among the works there that inspired her. She was particularly attracted to Japanese and Korean Folk art, whose direct and simple images from life she found to be so beautiful. She took a risk and began to paint full time and was able to sell many of her designs to Seventh Avenues high end trendiest designers. After a short time working for various designers, she set out on her own to launch the Bettina Marks Collections. Her unique style of, “sophisticated contemporaries,” with her refined colors and chic sensibility combined with her charismatic personality helped to further her reach into the international marketplace. Many of her first designs graced the collections of designers who were just launching their brands including Adrienne Vittadini. Bettina’s “graffiti print” was featured in every window at Macy’s Herald Square, and was so successful for Vittadini, that they carried it through for another season and into both the missy and junior markets. From that print, Vittadini’s graphic sweaters were born, a signature style for her.
Bettina's markets grew to include swimwear, juniors, menswear and home fashions. Her designs have sold in both the better and moderate markets in New York, California, Japan and South America. Randolph Duke bought designs while he was a swimwear designer at Gottex.  She began developing “stories” for Pottery Barn and other Home Product manufacturers for their tabletop products and helped to launch Sakura’s “fashion-forward” trendy and moderately priced dinnerware collections. Bettina has entered into a new licensing deal with Robinson Home Furnishings formerly Oneida. Ltd. (who purchased Sakura) to develop and license her brand name to several collections of dinnerware product for their markets.
Designs have been licensed to Tantex/Raytex Corporation, USA, a company that produced home fashions for the outdoor market and to Westpoint Stevens. Designs for bedding were developed for Hanover Direct (Domestications Catalogues) for Penneys and to Brittanica Home Fashions for juvenile bedding for Target and infant quilts designs for Penneys. Designs have appeared on giftware products and paper goods including stationery, gift-wrap and on fashion boxes.
The trademark signature is her own and has been licensed to several manufacturers, both here and in Japan. It was licensed to Shiroya, Ltd, JAPAN for limited use on luxury accessory products developed and/or designed by Bettina Marks for the cosmetic industry including a one of a kind leather wallet and leather makeup bag.  Bettina was named after the last wife of the Aga Khan, a model. Perhaps that has imbued her with the ambition and expectation of enjoying extensive travel and opportunities in foreign lands. She has traveled and worked throughout Europe, Latin America, the Middle East and Japan. It is source of inspiration.
She is an extremely versatile designer, although her style is unique and memorable. She takes on each market as a challenge. She has designed dresses, sportswear, junior clothing and home collections for bed, bath and kitchen. Currently she is expanding her retail image into both the domestic and international marketplace by furthering her online and international licensing business.
Inspired by nature, she now resides on the ocean just 25 miles from midtown Manhattan.

Artist Statement from “REMEMBRANCE OF THINGS  PAST” - an Exhibition of Paintings and Drawings by Bettina Marks
One of the major concerns by Marcel Proust in his book, “Remembrance of Things Past,” is to show that his artist-hero has lived a creative life of profound personal and social value. Through his hero, Proust returns to his own beginnings and all points in between, not so much as he personally experienced them, but, as he wished his artist-hero to profit from them. His character, then, is not the biographical Proust, but a reflective and an artistic Proust who re-experienced the past in the light of Proust’s present knowledge. “I feel that there is much to be said for the Celtic belief that the souls of those whom we have lost are held captive in some inferior being, in an animal, in a plant, in some inanimate object, and so effectively lost to us until the day (which to many never comes) when we happen to pass by the tree or to obtain possession of the object which forms their prison. Then they start and tremble, they call us by our name, and as soon as we have recognized their voice the spell is broken. We have delivered them: they have overcome death and return to share our life. And so it is with our own past. It is a labour in vain to attempt to recapture it: all the efforts of our intellect must prove futile. The past is hidden somewhere outside the realm, beyond the reach of intellect, in some material object (in the sensation which that material object will give us) which we do not suspect. And as for that object, it depends on chance whether we come upon it or not before we ourselves must die. “ These paintings and drawings are “material objects.” The unfolding of the past through the present and vice versa is an achievement of spatial organization… which Marcel Proust uniquely structured in “Remembrance of Things Past.” It can be described as a cubistic “canvas” with its many criss-crossings of time… BETTINA MARKS May 7, 2005



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Who\\\'s Smiling Now Daddy?


51 x 41 in.


Oil on Canvas


       

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